Blue Star Amsonia

Amsonia tabernaemontana

Blue Star Amsonia is a stunning perennial that thrives in the temperate climate of Southeast Wisconsin. This plant is known for its lovely clusters of star-shaped blue flowers that bloom in late spring to early summer, providing a striking contrast against its narrow, willow-like leaves. As the season progresses, the foliage transforms into a beautiful golden hue, adding interest to the garden well into fall.

This versatile plant is highly adaptable, thriving in both full sun and partial shade, and it prefers well-drained soil. Blue Star Amsonia is also drought-tolerant once established, making it an excellent choice for low-maintenance gardens. In addition to its aesthetic appeal, this perennial is resistant to pests and diseases, ensuring a healthy, vibrant addition to your landscape.

Incorporating Blue Star Amsonia into your garden can enhance its visual appeal while attracting beneficial pollinators like bees and butterflies. Whether used in mass plantings, borders, or as a specimen plant, Blue Star Amsonia is sure to become a favorite in your garden.

Blue Star Amsonia | Image by Annette Meyer

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