In the Spotlight

The garden center at Heritage Hill Nursery is stocked with many different varieties of plants and trees that is sure to meet almost everyone’s landscaping needs, from the new and exciting to the everyday classics.  As our newest addition to the website, each week we will be showcasing one of these fabulous finds on our very own “Weekly Spotlight”. 

Along with our special offers and seasonal garden and lawn tips, visit here often to consider additional ideas for your own garden and ways to beautify your outdoor living space! 

Don’t Forget Your Furry Friends

Now is the time for being diligent with filling the feeders. Birds that don’t migrate to warmer climates will need a food source in order to survive the upcoming months. It’s best to hang feeders at least 4’ above the ground, higher is actually better. Hanging a feeder too low will encourage four legged animals to forage, leaving empty feeders overnight. Birds will also need access to fresh water. Placing a special water heater in the bird bath will prevent freezing.

Week of November 30th, 2019

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Preparing For Winter

Even though the season is coming to an end, there is still plenty to do for your landscape before the snow. Walk through your yard, do you see any big twigs, piles of leaves? Rake all leaves and remove all branches as they will cause dead spots on your lawn. Make sure all garden hoses are removed from water sources and put away. Leaving hoses outside year-round can cause moisture to freeze within the house and could weaken or crack the inner wall. Bring in any cement/concrete lawn ornaments to prevent cracks from freezing/thawing temps. Dump out any large fountains and cover them with fountain covers that can withstand heavy winds and snow. If the fountains are smaller, it’s better to just bring them inside. Dump out any flowerpots and if moveable, store them inside for the season. Heavier pots should have covers over them to protect from freezing/thawing/snow.

Week of November 23rd, 2019

Click photo to for larger view. Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Preparing roses for a long winter’s nap

Although roses boughten at our nursery are meant for zones 4-5, sometimes they need a little bit of help to successfully make it through the winter months. Remove some of the mulch from the planting beds (otherwise you may need to purchase some) and sprinkle the mulch all around the rose/shrubs making sure to provide a thick layer of protection. Covering the entire rose/shrubs isn’t necessary. In fact, you never want to cover any plant with plastic containers, Styrofoam or anything else that doesn’t allow for good air flow. During warmer days the temperature inside the coverings double. Have enough of these warmer days and the plant will begin to come out of hibernation and once that happens and the weather drops, the new growth dies and will turn black. This doesn’t mean the plant is dead, but it’ll take until the next season for full recovery.

Week of November 16th, 2019

Click photo to for larger view. Photo by Pret Basu on Unsplash.

Bonide Wilt Stop

Using protective barriers can help your investment survive the cold weather and other elements. Barriers such as Bonide Wilt Stop (that can be purchased at our nursery) is a recommended product. Comes in two different sizes to meet your needs and is extremely easy to use. Dilute as directed on label and then spray on both sides of the leaves, needles and stems until runoff. Once applied, a soft clear and flexible film will form that will protect the plant from drying out, drought, wind burn, sun scald, winter kill, and salt damage. The film doesn’t prevent the plant’s growing process and can be used year-round. However, application should be applied before freezing and will last for the entire season. Wilt Stop can be used on almost all your landscape.

Week of November 9th, 2019

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Limelight Hydrangea – Tree Form

Drive around any neighborhood and you’ve probably seen a few of these neat little trees in front yards displaying big beautiful flower clusters. There are several different varieties of Hydrangea trees that will thrive in our zone. A fan favorite is the Limelight. Whether in a planting bed or as a standalone, this little tree will not disappoint. Big bright lime-green flowers appear in mid-summer and as the flowers age, the blooms will display different shades of pink and burgundy. Much like the shrub form, flowers on new wood, so pruning can be done in winter or early spring.
More Info

 

Week of October 26th, 2019

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Blue Muffin Viburnum

Privacy screens/hedges are often composed of the traditional Cotoneaster, Boxwood, or Yew. While these plants make excellent choices if you’re into monochrome coloring. Viburnums, especially the Blue Muffin, however, make beautiful alternatives. Springtime brings an abundance of white flowers that are later followed by rich clusters of blue berries. Looking for that dual purpose shrub? Plant other viburnum varieties for greater displays of color while providing feathery friends both food and shelter. The Blue Muffin Viburnum will mature between 5-7’ in height and 4-6’ in width and can handle a variety of soil/light conditions.
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Week of October 19th, 2019

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SnowSweet® Apple

The University of Minnesota has been known for their abilities in creating perfect cold hardy apples for cooler climates like ours. The SnowSweet® is just that… Perfect!! A cross between ‘Sharon’ and ‘Connell Red’, SnowSweet® has a deliciously sweet, slightly tart taste that is slower to oxidize when cut. Besides being sweet, these beauties have an above average resistance to diseases, like fireblight and scab. ‘Honeycrisp’ another good tasting apple, makes a good pollinator.
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Week of October 12th, 2019

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Millenium Ornamental Onion

Looking for a plant that can handle that hot afternoon sun? The Millenium Ornamental Onion will do just that. Begins blooming when most perennials have reached their end, giving your planting beds that extra boost of color for the rest of the season. Not only eye-catching and easy to grow, this perennial also seems to be deer proof. Planting a few of these in your garden may deter them from eating other plants as well.
More Info

 

Week of October 5th, 2019

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Blueberry Delight Juniper

Some planting beds utilize a mixture of different shrubs and perennials to create depth versus having all plants of the same height. A good option when needing a low to the ground shrub, is the Blueberry Delight Juniper. When planted in full sun, this low slowly spreading beauty will stand out from the rest. In the spring and summer its dark, green needles will have a silvery blue line on the upper leaves surface that will provide subtle contrast of color and in the fall the needles will take on a coppery color. Topping off at 1’ in height the Blueberry Delight is fairly low maintenance, poor soil tolerant and deer resistant. More Info

 

9/28/19

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Cool Splash® Dwarf Bush Honeysuckle

Are your planting beds mostly green after the flowers are done blooming? In need of more variety in color? Why not try the Cool Splash® Dwarf Bush Honeysuckle? White and green variegated leaves remain crisp in color until the first frost. In the summer, the shrub is adorned in bright yellow flowers. Not only a compact beauty, but it’s easy to grow in multiple soil conditions handling full sun to part shade. More Info

 

9/21/19

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Limelight Hydrangea Tree

Driving through the neighborhoods you’ve probably seen this nifty specimen. A perfectly mounded, petite little tree covered in big pinnacle lime, pinkish to burgundy colored flowers. Perfect for smaller gardens or as a standalone, the Limelight Hydrangea Tree is a showstopper. The flowers first begin emerging in mid to late summer and remain on the tree until they are pruned in winter or early spring, thus maintaining its focal point as it ages. Flowers can remain on the tree or can be removed and dried for floral arrangements. More Info

 

9/14/19

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Pulmonaria 

Now that the kids are back in school there’s still plenty of time to focus on landscaping. Cooler temperatures and warm soil are a perfect mix for a variety of plants. By taking a good look at your planting beds now, you’ll be able to see where there is room for added color. Consider adding Pulmonaria (Lungwort, Bethlehem Sage) to fill in any areas requiring less height. This under used perennial has unique features. The leaves are a darker green with yellowish specks and the flowers are vibrant and full of color. The Pulmonaria is versatile being able to withstand both sunny and shadier locations. More Info

 

9/7/19

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Winecraft Black Smokebush

The Winecraft Black smokebush will have you saying “WOW” all summer long.

In the spring, the leaves emerge a rich purple.  As the temperatures warm, the leaves turn to a deep near-black color.  In fall, the leaves almost light up in an array of reds and oranges.

That’s not all!  In summer, soft panicled bloom appears that looks like a misty “smoke” above the leaves.  It grows about 4-6’ tall and wide with a naturally rounded, dwarf habit.  This is a must have for any landscape!

More Info

8/26/19

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Green Mountain Boxwood

For a great vertical accent that stays green all year, the Green Mountain Boxwood is a great solution.

This Broadleaf Evergreen grows to 5’ tall and 3’ wide.  It has a very pyramidal shape that can be sheared for a formal look or just left alone to do it’s own thing. 

Either way, it looks amazing.  This plant also makes a great formal or informal low hedge.  If you are the creative type and like living sculpture, this shrub can be made into a topiary.

More Info

 

8/19/19

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Summer Crush

The NEW and so very cool for 2019 is the Endless Summer – Summer Crush! 

The flower is completely different from what you are used to seeing in a Hydrangea!  This shrub produces big raspberry red to neon purple blooms.  The color is absolutely stunning! The is also a compact and tidy shrub that looks great throughout the summer.  It grows to 3’ by 3’ so it makes a great addition to the patio area.  This one is a must see!

More Info

 

8/12/19

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Parkland Pillar Birch

For someone who has a small yard and loves the look of the Paper Birch, this tree is ideal!

The Parkland Pillar Birch (Betula platyphylla ‘Jefpark’) is a great solution.  This is a very columnar tree with dense, dark-green foliage grows 30’ tall and only 6’ wide. In fall, the leaves turn a beautiful golden color. 

In winter, the white bark is a wonderful contrasting feature.  This tree makes a great accent to up-light at night.  During the summer this is an excellent tree for a privacy screen.

 

More Info

 

8/4/19

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Scarlet Heaven Itoh Peony

HELLO SUMMER!  The Itoh Scarlet Peony  (Paeonie x ‘Scarlet Heaven’) screams just that! 

This perennial grows 30” tall and 36” wide.   Huge, deep scarlet flowers with gold center anthers provide a stunning spring display on this unique and rare Itoh peony. Blooms are held on strong stems that need no staking, showcased against a robust mound of lush, dark green foliage that holds up well into autumn.

This is the perfect plant for mid-border.  This selection forms a tall, upright bush of lush green leaves that stand up well into the autumn. Red flowering Itoh Peonies are rare and this one is considered one of the best; an outstanding performer.

Peonies seldom need to be divided or moved, but if it is necessary it should be carried out only in the fall. Flowering is always best in a sunny location. Let this perennial welcome summer to your garden!!

More Info

7/29/19

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Mr. Bowling Ball Arborvitae

Easy care?  Low maintenance?  Almost perfectly round?  Great color all year?  Well, then put a bowling ball in your yard!  That’s Mr. Bowling Ball for you!!

The Thuja occidentalis ‘Bobazam’ (Mr. Bowling Ball Arborvitae) is perfect for the limited space garden and as an accent shrub.  It is very slow growing.  It get 2-3’ tall and 2-3’ wide.  

It is a dwarf evergreen that  forms  a perfect sphere of feathery, soft sage-green new foliage.  It tolerates clay soil, full sun to partial shade, and best of all – the deer don’t really care for it!!!  It’s the kind of shrub that you plant it and admire it!

More Info

7/22/19

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Solar Eclipse Foamy Bells

You know that area in your yard that gets partial sun and needs something to make a statement? Then the Heucherella x ‘Solar Eclipse’ commonly known as Solar Eclipse Foamy Bells is just the ticket! 

It grows to 16” tall (leaves only 6”) and 16” wide.  This perennial offers a unique color that lasts all season with mound-forming habit.  Broadly scalloped, red brown, semi-evergreen foliage bordered in lime green. 

It then gets dense sprays of star-shaped white flowers in late May to early June It does need to be deadheaded after flowering.  If needed, cut back to new basal foliage after flowering.  Dead-leaf in spring.  It thrives in partial shade/sun!

More Info

7/15/19

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Little Henry Dwarf Sweetspire

Do you have a small area in the shade that needs to be brightened up? Have a sunny area that needs a small shrub?  Overly moist to even wet soil? 

Then this is the plant for you!  Itea virginica ‘Sprich’ known as Little Henry Dwarf Sweetspire is ideal.  It grows only 2-3’ tall and about 3’ wide.  It is a low, compact mounded shrub  making it ideal for the mixed perennial border. 

Late spring to early summer boasts cascading spires of sweetly fragrant, pure white flowers.  Emerald green foliage becomes brilliant multitude of oranges and reds in fall. It prefers moist soils and will tolerate wet conditions. It will grow in full sun to full shade, and requires little pruning or other maintenance!  Not bad for a little guy!!

More Info

7/8/19

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Rosy Returns Daylily

Looking for a soft, welcoming, rosy color in your garden?  Then Hemerocallis ‘Rosy Returns’ also known as Rosy Returns Daylily is a perfect fit!

It grows 14” tall and 24” wide.  It is classified as a Dwarf.  It has sturdy clumps of grassy foliage. 

Plants are tolerant of summer heat and humidity, but appreciate deep watering in dry spells to keep foliage attractive.  Blooms in June and is REBLOOMING.  By removing they spent flower stems, the plant will regenerate and produce more flowers. 

Daylilies are extremely adaptable perennials. They are easy to grow and relatively pest free. Rabbits and Deer tend to avoid daylilies. Each flower is rose-pink with a deeper rose eye zone and a yellow throat. Flowers bloom from late May through September (sometimes to first frost). The flowers are fragrant, so plant them close to the spaces you will be sitting to enjoy them!

More About Care & Features

9/6/18 

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Honeylocust (Northern Acclaim)

Are you looking for a stately, graceful tree that provides light shade?  Need to partially shade a patio or sitting area? 

Then Gleditsia triacanthos ‘Northern Acclaim’ or Northern Acclaim Honey locust  is the answer!  It grows 40-50’ tall and 30-35’ tall.                It is a  medium to large spreading upright pyramidal tree selection of thornless honeylocust with excellent  winter hardiness. 

Fall color is a beautiful golden yellow. It is best grown in organically rich, moist, well-drained soils in full sun. However, it is very tolerant of a wide range of soils. It is also tolerant of wind, high summer heat, drought and saline (road salt) conditions.  It is also Deer resistant.

More Info about Honeylocust

6/24/19

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Above Image Courtesy of: USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Administration, Bismarck.

Birds Nest Spruce

If you are going to feed the birds, now give them a nest! The Picea abies ‘Nidiformis’ is also called Bird’s Nest Spruce. 

It typically grows 2-3′ tall and 4-6′ wide, but it takes quite a while to do it.  Makes a dense, spreading, nest-like mound of attractive, bright green needles. Useful in foundation plantings or set off with ground covers. It is a slow-growing dwarf cultivar that typically grows to only 1-2’ tall and 3-4’ wide over the first 10 years, eventually maturing to as much as 6’ tall and 10-12’ wide over 30 years.

It features spreading, horizontal to slightly ascending branches which form a dense, broad-rounded, shrubby, flattened globe. Mature plants have a depression or “nest” in the center of the flattened top, hence the common name of bird’s-nest spruce. Thin dark gray needles (to 3/4” long).  Excellent evergreen for rock gardens, border fronts, foundations or specimen/accent around the home. It can also be grown in containers.

It is very similar to the Dwarf Norway Spruce. 

More Info

6/17/19

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Black Chokeberry

Do you like feeding the birds in winter? Then Aronia melanocarpa ‘Morton’ known as Iroquois Beauty Black Chokeberry is for you!

It grows 2-3’ tall and 4-5’ wide.  Has attractive white flower clusters in late spring. Glossy dark green summer foliage, and purple-red fall color. Open, spreading, dwarf shrub with a rounded, slowly suckering habit. Black drooping berry clusters provide winter interest.

The compact form and relatively small size of Iroquois Beauty™ make it suitable for a number of landscape uses. It blends effectively in a foundation planting as well as in a shrub border. The small scale makes it useful in transitioning between perennials to larger-scale shrubs. It blends extremely well in the naturalistic landscape or woodland garden. The fruit is a good food source for wildlife. 

Full sun to partial shade and wet to dry soil conditions. Best flowering, fruiting and fall color occur in sunnier locations.

More Info

6/9/19

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Hedge Cotoneaster

Do you need screening mainly during the warm weather? Do you like to watch the birds feed?  Then the Cotoneaster Lucidus or Hedge Cotoneaster is the ideal shrub for you!  It grows to 10′ tall and about 6′ wide.  It is an excellent hedge plant that withstands pruning and or shearing.

The show starts in spring with small pink flowers. The flowers are followed by black 3/8” berries that ripen to dark blue.  In fall the leaves turn red and yellow color.  This shrub will tolerate full sun to partial shade.  It is used as a Xeriscape plant, so it will handle dry soil and drought.  In the winter, the birds will feed on the berries, if there are any left! 

For more extensive information and additional photos – Click here 

More Info

6/2/19

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The Blues Little Bluestem

Schizachyrium scoparium ‘The Blues’.  Say What??  Slowly say it as you see it, you will get it!             

The Blues Little Bluestem is the common name for this week’s spotlight and doesn’t hurt when you say it!  This grass has a clump forming and upright habit, not a runner.  So easy to grow, it tolerates poor soil including CLAY. It typically grows 24-36” tall and 12-18” wide and has mature seed heads of tiny, fluffy, silver white.  Foliage is bluer than the species and turns purple to coral-orange in fall.  Super low maintenance is a bonus! Fantastic winter interest in your garden.

More Info

5/24/19

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Karen Rhododendron / Azalea

We are featuring the Rhododendron x ‘Karen’, also known as the Karen Rhododendron or Karen Azalea in this week’s spotlight.

Talk about a statement!  This Broadleaf Evergreen does just that.  It usually grows 2-4’ tall and 3-5’ wide.  An unusually hardy and highly reliable evergreen shrub with rich lavender-purple hose-in-hose flowers on a vigorous upright plant. Foliage turns a brilliant burgundy in the fall. It is the showiest when planted in groups of 3 or more. An ideal spring blooming foundation shrub for beds and borders. 

More Info

5/18 /19

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Autumn Brilliance® Apple Serviceberry

This weeks featured plant is the Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Autumn Brilliance’, commonly known as  Autumn Brilliance Serviceberry.  The name really says it all!  This is a small, deciduous, usually multi-trunked, under-story tree or tall shrub which typically grows to 15-20’ tall and wide.  It usually blooms in Late April with a cloud of white flowers followed by edible fruits (3/8″ diameter) in June (hence the sometimes used common name of Juneberry for amelanchiers). Berries resemble blueberries in taste and may be used in jams, jellies and pies. You will have to fight with the birds to get enough! The leaves emerge with bronze tints in spring, mature to dark green from late spring throughout summer before finally turning brilliant red to orange-red in fall.  A plant for all seasons!

More Info

5/10/19

Baton Rouge Dogwood

This week featured plant is the Cornus alba ‘Minbat’, commonly known as Baton Rouge Dogwood.  This shrub was selected for its naturally compact, bushy habit.  It grows 4-5’ tall and 4-5’ wide.  That’s not the only benefit! It offers amazing year round interest! White spring flowers are followed by white berries that are attractive to birds. The medium green foliage transforms to a brilliant reddish purple hue in autumn. Bright red stems in winter make a spectacular display or you can cut them for Holiday arrangements!!!

More Info

5/5/19

The Blues Little Bluestem

Schizachyrium scoparium ‘The Blues’.  Say What??  Slowly say it as you see it, you will get it!             

The Blues Little Bluestem is the common name for this week’s spotlight and doesn’t hurt when you say it!  This grass has a clump forming and upright habit, not a runner.  So easy to grow, it tolerates poor soil including CLAY. It typically grows 24-36” tall and 12-18” wide and has mature seed heads of tiny, fluffy, silver white.  Foliage is bluer than the species and turns purple to coral-orange in fall.  Super low maintenance is a bonus! Fantastic winter interest in your garden.

More Info

5/24/19

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Birds Nest Spruce

If you are going to feed the birds, now give them a nest! The Picea abies ‘Nidiformis’ is also called Bird’s Nest Spruce. 

It typically grows 2-3′ tall and 4-6′ wide, but it takes quite a while to do it.  Makes a dense, spreading, nest-like mound of attractive, bright green needles. Useful in foundation plantings or set off with ground covers. It is a slow-growing dwarf cultivar that typically grows to only 1-2’ tall and 3-4’ wide over the first 10 years, eventually maturing to as much as 6’ tall and 10-12’ wide over 30 years.

It features spreading, horizontal to slightly ascending branches which form a dense, broad-rounded, shrubby, flattened globe. Mature plants have a depression or “nest” in the center of the flattened top, hence the common name of bird’s-nest spruce. Thin dark gray needles (to 3/4” long).  Excellent evergreen for rock gardens, border fronts, foundations or specimen/accent around the home. It can also be grown in containers.

It is very similar to the Dwarf Norway Spruce. 

More Info

6/17/19

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Little Henry Dwarf Sweetspire

Do you have a small area in the shade that needs to be brightened up? Have a sunny area that needs a small shrub?  Overly moist to even wet soil? 

Then this is the plant for you!  Itea virginica ‘Sprich’ known as Little Henry Dwarf Sweetspire is ideal.  It grows only 2-3’ tall and about 3’ wide.  It is a low, compact mounded shrub  making it ideal for the mixed perennial border. 

Late spring to early summer boasts cascading spires of sweetly fragrant, pure white flowers.  Emerald green foliage becomes brilliant multitude of oranges and reds in fall. It prefers moist soils and will tolerate wet conditions. It will grow in full sun to full shade, and requires little pruning or other maintenance!  Not bad for a little guy!!

More Info

7/8/19

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Mr. Bowling Ball Arborvitae

Easy care?  Low maintenance?  Almost perfectly round?  Great color all year?  Well, then put a bowling ball in your yard!  That’s Mr. Bowling Ball for you!!

The Thuja occidentalis ‘Bobazam’ (Mr. Bowling Ball Arborvitae) is perfect for the limited space garden and as an accent shrub.  It is very slow growing.  It get 2-3’ tall and 2-3’ wide.  

It is a dwarf evergreen that  forms  a perfect sphere of feathery, soft sage-green new foliage.  It tolerates clay soil, full sun to partial shade, and best of all – the deer don’t really care for it!!!  It’s the kind of shrub that you plant it and admire it!

More Info

7/22/19

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Winecraft Black Smokebush 

The Winecraft Black smokebush will have you saying “WOW” all summer long. 

In the spring, the leaves emerge a rich purple.  As the temperatures warm, the leaves turn to a deep near-black color.  In fall, the leaves almost light up in an array of reds and oranges. 

That’s not all!  In summer, soft panicled bloom appears that looks like a misty “smoke” above the leaves.  It grows about 4-6’ tall and wide with a naturally rounded, dwarf habit.  This is a must have for any landscape!

More Info

 

7/29/19

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In the Spotlight

Millenium Ornamental Onion

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In the Spotlight

SnowSweet® Apple

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In the Spotlight

Blue Muffin Viburnum

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In the Spotlight

Limelight Hydrangea - Tree Form

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