It’s Important to Keep Watering Trees & Shrubs Throughout Autumn

Evergreens Really Need Water Before Winter!

The gardening season isn’t over while there’s still watering to do,  according to Sharon Yiesla, Plant Clinic assistant at The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IL.

Going into winter with dry roots can cause trouble for plants in spring. If the roots are damaged because they dried out in fall, they can’t absorb water in spring. Water stored in their roots supports early spring growth. If the reservoir is low, they can start out the year stressed by drought and never get over it.

If you water nothing else, water evergreens and any trees and shrubs that were planted this year or last year.

Newly planted trees haven’t had time to grow a large system of roots to absorb and store water, so they need frequent watering to make up for it.

Evergreens need stored-up water to make up for what they lose through their leaves, especially in the cold, dry air of winter. “People don’t realize that water is leaving those needles all winter long,” Yiesla said. When evergreens don’t absorb a sufficient water supply in fall, their needles can dry out, turn brown and die.

 

Courtesy Chicago Tribune – READ MORE

Seasonal Tips for late Autumn Planting of Perennials in Wisconsin

Peonies – and Perennials to Plant in Fall! 

As we move into fall, and we’re still enjoying some warm days, but cooler nights. So now is the time to consider adding perennials and flowering shrubs that will add color and beauty to your landscaping.

Planting in fall, is, most often a perfect time to plant and allow the plant to become established for next the next year’s growing season.  In general, plants with shallow, fibrous root systems can be planted more easily in the fall than those with fewer, larger roots.  

These include perennials and shrubs & trees such as: 

This upcoming month of October Heritage Hill is offering 50% off of all Perennials, so it’s a really perfect time to consider planting! 

Last week and still showing in the spotlight is the Sunsparkler® Firecracker Sedum, a perennial you may want to consider!

A few weeks back, we featured the beautiful Sara Bernhardt Peony on our Spotlight Page.The peony is, without a doubt one of the most favored beautiful plants in Wisconsin. We recommend the below article for great planting advice for peonies from Farmer’s almanac! 

Courtesy Farmer’s Almanac Planting Peonies

Remember if you have any questions, contact our knowledgeable horticulturist & owner, Jason. He’ll help you make good decisions on what will work best and how to properly tend to your new plantings. Visit the Heritage Hill Nursery and garden center now! We are conveniently located, close to Cedarburg, Jackson, West Bend, Slinger, WI.

 

Take advantage of our
October Special Offer! 

 

 

Planting Before the First Frost in Wisconsin

In our neck of the woods, Southeastern Wisconsin, fall planting for perennials, flowers and trees is really perfect.  

On average the first frost runs sometime between September 30 to October 30. Fall offers many benefits for planting, not the least of which is the warm soil under the surface to allows root structures to flourish, whereas with spring planing, only a few inches deep the ground may still be quite cool and even still retain a frost line. 

Plus fall weather often offers fewer rainy, soggy days;  (although we have had our share this year!), but generally adequate rainfall; the garden pests are reduced; and you should have no need of fertilizer – wait until spring to fertilize. As with any new planting, if the rain is not there, then, make sure to water your new growth so it receives at least an inch of water every week before the colds sets in. 

A double whammy is that here at Heritage Hill we have our end of the season special discounts. Right now buy 4 potted trees and get the 5th absolutely free. Come October, we’ll be offering another planting opportunity.. visit us then as well, to see what you may want to add to your fall planting plans! 

 

 Take advantage of our
October whopper deals!

AND 50% Off of all Balled & Burlap Trees! 

 

 

 

Planting Trees in September in Wisconsin

Fall Planting of Diciduous Trees 

Many experts claim that planting trees in fall is better. In fall, the tree can make new roots without having to feed the leaves. Water requirements are much lower without the leaves on the tree. To us it feels cool in fall, but that is actually the best temperature for root growth. Roots grow best in cool soil.

A fall planting allows the tree to grow roots in fall and again early spring before leaves develop. This gives the tree a good chance to lay down a good set of roots before they need to collect water and nutrients for the leaves.

It’s preferable to choose deciduous trees because they lose their leaves in fall, and once this happens, the requirements for water are vastly reduced. Growing roots still require water, but that is a small amount compared the what leaves use. Fall planting of deciduous trees works better because of this lower water requirement in winter.

 

Courtesy Garden Myths  More  

Questions about planting, feeding and watering? Take advantage of our knowledgeable horticulturist & owner, Jason. He is here to help you make good decisions on what will work best and how to properly tend to your new plantings. Visit the Heritage Hill Nursery and garden center now! We are conveniently located, close to Cedarburg, Jackson, West Bend, Slinger, WI.

Don’t forget! Take advantage of our
September Special Offers 

And buy 4 get 1 free
for all potted trees! 

 

 

 

 

Caring for Roses in the Fall

This week’s spotlight is the Mystic Fairy Shrub Rose.  So we putting out info courtesy of Heirloom Roses, on how to keep your rose bush healthy as we move into winter.


High temperatures may have induced a brief period of summer dormancy, especially in hotter parts of the country, but once the weather starts to cool, many roses put on a fantastic show well into fall. The change in weather often brings wind and rainy conditions; the reappearance of diseases like black spot and powdery mildew provide a reminder that next year’s success depends on putting the roses to bed for the winter.

 

10 Steps for a Healthier Spring

 

  1. Stop deadheading 8 to 10 weeks before the first frost. This will harden off roses, allowing tender new growth time to toughen prior to potentially damaging cold weather. If your roses have hips, allow them to develop naturally. You’ll be rewarded with seasonal interest.
  2. Stop transplanting and fertilizing prior to the onset of cold weather to prevent the rose from pushing new growth. No-nitrogen fertilizers intended to promote root development, such as super phosphates, are an exception to this rule and can be applied in fall and winter.
  3. Rake up and destroy all leaves at the base of roses. Do not compost, as this could spread pathogens. Many fungal diseases that affect roses overwinter on the rose or as litter on the ground. Removing this material will reduce problems the following spring.
  4. Clip off diseased leaves from the bush. Pulling leaves off can create small tears along the stem and provide an entry point for disease.
  5. Prune off failed buds (called balling) that did not open due to rainy conditions. This will help to prevent botrytis dieback.

 

Read the next 5 steps!  

 

 

 

Visit our Spotlight this week
to learn more about the gorgeous
Easy Elegance® Mystic Fairy® Rose

General Lawn Care in Late Summer

 August Lawn Care 

Proper mowing practices contribute to a healthy lawn and minimal weeds. Often lawns are mowed to closely. 

Height

  • For a typical residential Midwest lawn, maintain a height of 3 inches or higher.
    • Taller grass shades out weed seeds and keeps soil cooler.
    • Taller grass means longer roots and greater ability to withstand drought and reach nutrients.
  • Remove no more than 1/3 of the leaf tissue when you mow.

    • Mowing too short or scalping results in stress to the grass plant. Weak grass plants will take longer to recover. To maintain a 3-inch lawn, mow before the grass reaches 4.5 inches tall.

    • Mowing too short can allow weed seeds to get more sun and increase the chance of germination.
  • Water your lawn as needed
  • Establish a new lawn or renovate your current lawn. Note that mid-August to mid-September is the best time to establish a lawn in Wisconsin
  • Watch for insects, diseases, and other lawn problems
  • From late August into early October is a good time to aerate the lawn

 

Courtesy University of Minnesota Extention More

Questions about planting, feeding and watering? Take advantage of our knowledgeable horticulturist & owner, Jason. He is here to help you make good decisions on what will work best and how to properly tend to your new plantings. Visit the Heritage Hill Nursery and garden center now! We are conveniently located, close to Cedarburg, Jackson, West Bend, Slinger, WI.

Don’t forget! Take advantage of our
July Special Offers 
Good through July 31st