Wisconsin September Gardening Tips

Fall … a Good time to Plant!

Come autumn, many of us gardeners are tired and worn out, and welcome winter’s respite from watering and weeding. But experience nags us to plan ahead for something to welcome the coming spring with perky flowers that save us from the winter blues sure to come.

It’s easy enough to push a few early-blooming bulbs into the ground or in pots on the patio. Nothing soothes cabin fever like crocus and snowdrops peeping through the snow, a cheery potful of tulips, a tucked-in clump of Scilla, or a drift of muscari and daffodils. Even a vase of fragrant paperwhites forced in gravel and water on the kitchen counter can get our juices going again.

And of course there are some great cold-weather annuals, from faithful pansies, violas and wall flowers, to the intensely colorful foliage and spring flower spikes of kale. In a pinch, these can be reliable in themselves, or used to fill gaps between newly planted perennials which may not be as full the first season. 

But to get the most bang for your efforts, choose and plant hardy, long-lived spring-blooming perennials to get a head start and something to look forward to for years without the annual fuss of replanting. 

Check our Special Offers for all kinds of helpful information to keep your yard and garden looking simply beautiful!

Courtesy HGTV Outdoors More

Questions about planting, feeding and watering? Take advantage of our knowledgeable horticulturist & owner, Jason. He is here to help you make good decisions on what will work best and how to properly tend to your new plantings. Visit the Heritage Hill Nursery and garden center now! We are conveniently located, close to Cedarburg, Jackson, West Bend, Slinger, WI.

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August Tips for Wisconsin Gardeners!

Savor Summer Color in the Midwest 
August Garden Tips

Stock your patio and garden with plants that continue to flower as the temperature soars.

  • Annuals: Heat-lovers include verbena, Diamond Frost Euphorbia, Portulaca, and zinnia.
  • Tropicals: Mandevilla, brugmansia, hibiscus, and glory bower thrive on heat. In containers, increase flower number by feeding plants liquid bloom-booster fertilizer every 10-14 days.
  • Perennials: Black-eyed susan, coneflower, Shasta daisy, and bee balm all stage a stunning summer show.
  • Test Garden Tip: Deadheading is the process of removing faded flowers. This action encourages the formation of future blooms.
  • Container plantings can need watering as often as twice a day in hot, windy weather.

Mulch Matters — You may need to replenish mulches, especially those that break down quickly, such as straw or grass clippings. Mulches should be 1-3 inches.

Whack Your Weeds — Time weeding for after a good rain. Weeds come out easier and with more of the root.

Deadheading 101 — Keep deadheading! For the most flowers and tidiest garden, deadhead daily. Deadheading 101

  • Keep an eye out for aphids and spider mites. Treat with insecticidal soap. Spider mites, which also thrive in dry weather, can be treated with pyrethrums, an extract from mums.

Mulch Matters

Check our Seasonal Tips blog for all kinds of helpful information to keep your yard and garden looking simply beautiful!

Courtesy Better Homes & Gardens Online More

Questions about planting, feeding and watering? Take advantage of our knowledgeable horticulturist & owner, Jason. He is here to help you make good decisions on what will work best and how to properly tend to your new plantings. Visit the Heritage Hill Nursery and garden center now! We are conveniently located, close to Cedarburg, Jackson, West Bend, Slinger, WI.

 

Don’t forget! Take advantage of our
August Special Offer. 

 

 

 

 

July Tips for Wisconsin Gardeners

July – Perennial Garden Ideas

By Steven A. Frowine, The National Gardening Association

Perennials return each year to provide splashes of color and texture to garden beds and borders. Here are some basic garden layout tips and techniques used by professional garden designers that you can easily apply in your own garden.

The most common way to display perennials is together, in a large flowerbed or, space permitting, a long border of either meandering form or with firm boundaries. These methods of growing perennials are purely practical: You can prepare the soil, plant them together, and care for them.

  • Plan to be in scale: Some sense of proportion between your home, garage, and/or shed (whatever’s nearest to the proposed perennial garden) is key. A big house, for instance, does best with wider beds and taller plants; a smaller one is better served by a series of smaller beds and lower-growing plants.

  • Match garden style with structures: A casual bungalow, cottage, or one-level home likes an informal perennial garden, with wavy-edged boundaries; a larger or more imposing home, or one with strong architectural elements and lines, needs a more formal, straighter-edged approach.

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May Gardening Tips for Wisconsin Gardeners

Keep Perennials Healthy by Dividing

May brings May flowers and everything else green and growing.

However, no matter how warm gets now, early May is still too soon to plant most annual flowers such as impatiens, begonias, coleus, marigolds and so on. Most perennials, on the other hand, can be planted immediately. And it may be a good time to divide your perennials too.

Early spring is an ideal time to divide summer- and fall-flowering perennials. Try to tackle the task before plants reach 6 inches tall. Don’t forget to water newly transplanted divisions.

Not sure if you need to divide? Ask yourself these questions:

1) Are clumps too big and crowding other plants?

2) Has flowering been reduced during the last growing season(s)?

3) Does new growth ring a dead spot in the middle?

4) Do you want more starts of that perennial?

Above information courtesy Better Homes & Gardens 

 

Read More About Dividing Perennials
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