This week’s spotlight is the Mystic Fairy Shrub Rose.  So we putting out info courtesy of Heirloom Roses, on how to keep your rose bush healthy as we move into winter.


High temperatures may have induced a brief period of summer dormancy, especially in hotter parts of the country, but once the weather starts to cool, many roses put on a fantastic show well into fall. The change in weather often brings wind and rainy conditions; the reappearance of diseases like black spot and powdery mildew provide a reminder that next year’s success depends on putting the roses to bed for the winter.

 

10 Steps for a Healthier Spring

 

  1. Stop deadheading 8 to 10 weeks before the first frost. This will harden off roses, allowing tender new growth time to toughen prior to potentially damaging cold weather. If your roses have hips, allow them to develop naturally. You’ll be rewarded with seasonal interest.
  2. Stop transplanting and fertilizing prior to the onset of cold weather to prevent the rose from pushing new growth. No-nitrogen fertilizers intended to promote root development, such as super phosphates, are an exception to this rule and can be applied in fall and winter.
  3. Rake up and destroy all leaves at the base of roses. Do not compost, as this could spread pathogens. Many fungal diseases that affect roses overwinter on the rose or as litter on the ground. Removing this material will reduce problems the following spring.
  4. Clip off diseased leaves from the bush. Pulling leaves off can create small tears along the stem and provide an entry point for disease.
  5. Prune off failed buds (called balling) that did not open due to rainy conditions. This will help to prevent botrytis dieback.

 

Read the next 5 steps!  

 

 

 

Visit our Spotlight this week
to learn more about the gorgeous
Easy Elegance® Mystic Fairy® Rose